I’m a Capeverdean native living in Denmark, currently studying my engineering master degree in Sustainable Design. I am married to a Dane and we have 2 little princesses. I hope this blog inspires you in multiple ways. Feel free to leave a comment or follow me on social media!

In Her Universe 04 - Kirstine Marie Hansen

In Her Universe 04 - Kirstine Marie Hansen

Like most other global industries, fashion has its dark side, therefore it deserves to be taken seriously. The fashion industry is among the most aspirational and dynamic of all industries. The majority of new clothes are manufactured in factories at the third world country to keep costs low and margins high. According to a 2012 report from the International Labor Rights Forum, over one thousand garment workers have been killed since 1990 in preventable factory fires. For instance, Rana Plaza factory collapsed, killing over 1,100 garment workers and injuring over 2,500 more.

Therefore, we as consumers must hold ourselves accountable for our purchases. For many garment workers, a living wage is only a few pennies away; pennies that for us are just spare change. Whether or not we like to admit it, what we wear and how we wear it is inevitably influenced by how the fashion industry is build. One would hope that a higher price tag would guarantee that the person who made your clothes would automatically receive a living wage, but often this is not what happens.

The main issue is that it is hard to engage with the full picture. You can buy a fabric that is carefully produced but you can’t control it at every stage. Designers are depending on their producers who get their suppliers from elsewhere. There’s no information about it. There needs to be a more deep-rooted solution to how things are produced.

However, the fashion and textiles industries are hugely important economically for many, accounting for one person in six employments worldwide. This situation generates a huge paradox.  

So how can we consume clothing with a clear conscience? There is no single solution to this issue.

Now several smaller design-led companies are creating alternative approaches to eco-clothing, with an increasing focus on sending the right message.  NOE3OU decided to have a chat with Kirstine Hansen, which is the founder and the designer behind the brand WANTED?NEEDED.

The brand's focus is on sustainable  everyday fashion  made of organic cotton which are all locally produced in Denmark.

WANTED?NEEDED believe that they have responsibility for the impact our production has on our planet and people involved through design, materials and knowledge. The brand sees sustainable fashion as durable style and design that can be used season after season in different combinations.

Kirstine Hansen, graduated with a BA in Sustainable Fashion in 2015 because she dream of being part of changing the Fashion Industry and the shopping behaviour. She loves the creative process  and  the freedom to be imaginative and follow own ideas when creating garments.

The aim of the brand is to design for personal style and not based upon the fast moving trends with a hope to inspire others to be concious about their own shopping choices. Likewise,  to show that being stylish isn’t about following trends, but to find your own voice within what you wear.

The concept behind WANTED?NEEDED (Wanted or Needed) was created from the Idea of making consumers asking questions to their shopping habits and question the fashion industry. 

"Are we buying because we are in need of that piece of clothing or because we want it? I know that most people on the Danish market are not in need of a 500kr t-shirt but I hope to prouvoke some people to think about their choices when shopping. Hopefully inspire some to buy less but quality goods." Kirstine

 WANTED?NEEDED is also about collaborations with small artists and designers by using their work as prints.  Unusual prints that will make a reaction on people in some way.

 What does sustainability means to Kirstine?

"For me, this means using our resources in the best way possible and not compromising the future generation’s ability to meet their needs. When it comes to fashion, it should be fun and imaginative and we as designers needs to make creative solutions to make fashion exist." Kirstine

An advise/ message to the world?

Be curious and do not be afraid of asking questions. We all have responsibilities for our choices.

Take a look at WANTED?NEEDED website here and if you would like to know a bit more about their organic cotton sourcing read here.

 Photographer: Ricky Schiermer

Photographer: Ricky Schiermer

 Photographer: Ricky Schiermer

Photographer: Ricky Schiermer

With love,

Noe 

Craftmandship & Sustainable Fashion

Craftmandship & Sustainable Fashion

 Transparency Now!

Transparency Now!